A Photo Essay: The 9/11 Museum

On May 27th, I visited the recently opened 9/11 Museum in Downtown Manhattan. A somber occasion and a moving experience reliving the day that touched just about ever American alive on that horrific day as well as the supportive international community. Walking in the footprint of the towers where so many perished and so many heroes selflessly gave their own lives to help others was a humbling experience and one I would recommend to others living in or visiting NYC.

I've pulled together this photo essay to share my experience at the 9/11 Museum.

 The Twin Tower Tridents with Freedom Tower in the background.

The Twin Tower Tridents with Freedom Tower in the background.

 Looking down to the bottom floor of the museum. The wall to the left represents where the South Tower once stood. The mangled structure at the end of the hallway is the steel facade just below the point where Flight 11 struck the North Tower. 

Looking down to the bottom floor of the museum. The wall to the left represents where the South Tower once stood. The mangled structure at the end of the hallway is the steel facade just below the point where Flight 11 struck the North Tower. 

 Concourse Lobby of the Museum: A model of The Sphere and pictures of it (background) in its original setting next to the Twin Towers. It actually spun in the middle of the fountain and is now located in Battery Park with the damage of the fallen Twin Towers readily evident on the top and sides of the structure.

Concourse Lobby of the Museum: A model of The Sphere and pictures of it (background) in its original setting next to the Twin Towers. It actually spun in the middle of the fountain and is now located in Battery Park with the damage of the fallen Twin Towers readily evident on the top and sides of the structure.

 The Last Column, named as it was one of the last elements removed from Ground Zone.

The Last Column, named as it was one of the last elements removed from Ground Zone.

 The Slurry Wall: An innovative techniques deploy in the 1960's, based on Italian technical called slurry trenching, with the aim of keeping the Hudson River from flooding the basement of the Twin Towers. 

The Slurry Wall: An innovative techniques deploy in the 1960's, based on Italian technical called slurry trenching, with the aim of keeping the Hudson River from flooding the basement of the Twin Towers. 

 The World Trade Center Dedication Pedestal with scars and dents from 9/11.

The World Trade Center Dedication Pedestal with scars and dents from 9/11.

 The squares seen at the ground level, to the left, below the imposing structure are the box columns. They are the foundation of the columns that formed the outer framework of the World Trade Center. The imposing structure above represents the footprint of the tower. In this case, the South Tower. 

The squares seen at the ground level, to the left, below the imposing structure are the box columns. They are the foundation of the columns that formed the outer framework of the World Trade Center. The imposing structure above represents the footprint of the tower. In this case, the South Tower. 

 A quotation from Virgil's "Aeneld". The letters were constructed from medal salvaged from the Ground Zero site. The blue tiles represent the artist's attempt to recapture the blue color of the NYC sky the morning of 9/11.

A quotation from Virgil's "Aeneld". The letters were constructed from medal salvaged from the Ground Zero site. The blue tiles represent the artist's attempt to recapture the blue color of the NYC sky the morning of 9/11.

 A small portion of the radio antenna that resided atop the North Tower.

A small portion of the radio antenna that resided atop the North Tower.

 A portion of the North Tower Radio Antenna

A portion of the North Tower Radio Antenna

 A remnant of one of the powerful 10,000 pound elevator motors that pushed the World Trade Center express elevators from the lobby to the top of the building in just over a minute.  

A remnant of one of the powerful 10,000 pound elevator motors that pushed the World Trade Center express elevators from the lobby to the top of the building in just over a minute.  

 Box column remnants of the South Tower. This is where the foundation of the building was attached to the bedrock of NYC. 

Box column remnants of the South Tower. This is where the foundation of the building was attached to the bedrock of NYC. 

 The remnants of the North Tower (box columns) and the museum/structure that represents the footprint of the tower.

The remnants of the North Tower (box columns) and the museum/structure that represents the footprint of the tower.

Images of the 9/11 Memorial Fountains and surrounding World Trade Center buildings.